Scream therapy. Is it better out than in, asks Dr Zak?

I’m sure most will agree that the pandemic has given us a lot to advertise, but screaming in frustration is a useful tool if it can do more harm than good?

Scream therapy was first introduced in the 1970s by American psychotherapist Arthur Janov. He argued that most emotions and unhappiness were caused by repressed feelings, even from childhood.

Janov’s theory gained popularity thanks to famous clients, including John Lennon. The downside of scream therapy was that it demonstrated the benefits of other treatments with a proven track record, including cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT).

Read more: Be kind to your kidneys, says our resident, Dr. Zack

When we scream, we ask for a flight or combat response. This leads to an increase in the brain chemicals dopamine and norepinephrine. In the short term, this can bring some benefits by providing a temporary release, hopefully in an environment where no one else cares.

However, repeated yelling can worsen physical and mental health.

However, in the absence of really strong evidence of its usefulness, it has gained popularity. The groups gathered in the parking lots for scream therapy and we saw the appearance of quarter axes and quarters of anger.

Anger itself is not a harmful emotion. It arises from a sense of injustice and can help us make changes for the better. But anger is when this anger is released uncontrollably, with the potential to cause harm not only to the aggressor but also to those around him.

Anger can be a manifestation of a depressed or depressed mood. More traditional theories hold that for those who have anger, it is important to understand why they feel that way.

Just like identifying the cause of your anger, it is crucial to identify the triggers, which can often be quite insignificant.

Finally, this must be taken into consideration so that your response, if any, is considered proportionate and does not lose control. It may not be as easy as turning a second cheek, but blind anger can have serious consequences and will no doubt worsen your health.

This is not to say that scream therapy doesn’t have its place. Of course, fans of her strongly feel the amusement of her. It may not be for everyone.

Positive coping strategies with some gain and less potential for harm include exercise, meditation, and hobbies.

Above all, fight, don’t overlook the signs. Your doctor routinely specializes in diagnosing and treating mood disorders, and someone is always on the other side of the phone, day and night, in case of a crisis.

Source: Dailyecho

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Mercedes Davis

Mercedes Davis

Mercedes Davis, a prolific author at thepostedia.com, is recognized for her exceptional skills in article writing. With a keen eye for detail and a gift for storytelling, Helen crafts engaging and informative content that resonates with readers across various topics. Her contributions exemplify a deep passion for journalism and a commitment to delivering high-quality content.

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Mercedes Davis

Mercedes Davis

Mercedes Davis, a prolific author at thepostedia.com, is recognized for her exceptional skills in article writing. With a keen eye for detail and a gift for storytelling, Helen crafts engaging and informative content that resonates with readers across various topics. Her contributions exemplify a deep passion for journalism and a commitment to delivering high-quality content.

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